View Full Version: LATHROP, Andrew 15 Aug 2005

Porchlight International for the Missing & Unidentified > Missing Persons Cases 2005 > LATHROP, Andrew 15 Aug 2005


Title: LATHROP, Andrew 15 Aug 2005
Description: Hakodate, Japan


Fern - July 21, 2006 12:21 AM (GMT)
ANDREW LATHROP

user posted image

Case Type: Missing
DOB: Oct 19, 1984
Missing Date: Aug 15, 2005
Sex: Male
Age Now: 21
Height: 6'0" (183 cm)
Weight: 150 lbs (68 kg)
Hair Color: Blonde
Eye Color: Blue
Missing City: HAKODATE
Missing State : JAPAN
Missing Country: Japan

Case Number: NCMA1029040

Circumstances: Although Andrew is originally from Menasha, Wisconsin, he was last known to be hiking in Hakodate, Japan on August 15, 2005. He has not been seen since. Andrew's nickname is Andy.

http://international.missingkids.com/missi...earchLang=en_X1

oldies4mari2004 - June 14, 2007 09:26 PM (GMT)
UW-Madison Student Missing in Japan

Updated: 9:31 AM Aug 18, 2005
NBC 15


An international search is underway in Japan for a missing exchange student from UW–Madison.

20-year-old Andy Lathrop of Menasha is teaching English in Japan.

He and a friend took a trip Monday to the city of Hakodate on the northern island of Hokkaido. They split up, but agreed to meet up later that day to take a ferry back to Japan's main island. The friend said Lathrop never showed up, or responded to cell phone calls or messages.

Now, Andy's parents and his exchange program believe he is missing. Police in Japan are investigating, and searching for Lathrop.

He is supposed to return to Wisconsin on Saturday.

A weblog has been set up to help find him. For more information, log onto target="_blank">http://www.FindAndy.org/.



Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Aug 20 2005, 08:26 PM Post #2


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Menasha family plans to go to Japan to look for missing son

(Published Thursday, August 18, 2005 09:45:55 AM CDT)

Associated Press

MENASHA, Wis. - A Menasha family plans to head to Japan on Friday help look for their son and brother, who was last seen Monday in the port city Hakodate.

Leslie Lathrop said Thursday she and her husband, Steve, and their other children, Scott and Jessica, were preparing for the trip in an effort to find their other son, Andrew, 20.

"We are going to try to see what we can for ourselves," she said.

Marie Schaefer, the American consul general in Sapporo, Japan, said police began searching Wednesday for Andrew Lathrop, who failed to reunite with his travel companion as planned and whose cell phone stopped ringing.

"We have no idea what happened to him," she told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. "We're all concerned."

Lathrop moved to Japan last August and spent the last year living in the Tokyo area and teaching English through the Labo International Exchange Foundation.

Shanti Laird, one of the foundation's coordinators, told the newspaper that Lathrop and another American arrived Sunday in Hakodate and spent the day sightseeing. Laird said the two decided to go their separate ways Monday and had planned to get back together that evening, but Lathrop did not arrive as arranged.



Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Aug 20 2005, 08:27 PM Post #3


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Wisconsin family arrives in Japan to look for missing son

Posted on Sat, Aug. 20, 2005


Associated Press


TOKYO - The family of a Wisconsin man who went missing earlier this week arrived in Japan Saturday to look for him, according to a supporter of the family.

Andrew Lathrop, 20, was teaching English in Japan before he disappeared this week in the northern port city of Hakodate. His parents, Lesley and Steve Lathrop of Menasha, Wis., said they received a call Monday telling them their son was missing.

Lathrop moved to Japan last August after finishing his freshman year at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He spent the year living in the Tokyo area and teaching English through the Labo International Exchange Foundation. He was set to return home a week ago.

Marie Schaefer, the American consul general in Sapporo, Japan, said police began searching Wednesday for Lathrop, who failed to reunite with a travel companion as planned and whose cell phone stopped ringing.

Lathrop's parents arrived in Tokyo Saturday with their two other children, and will fly to Hakodate Sunday, according to Shanti Laird, one of the foundation's coordinators.

Police in Hakodate said the search for Lathrop continued Saturday.





Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Aug 25 2005, 08:36 AM Post #4


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Family Searches for Man Missing in Japan

Aug 23, 2005, 05:21 PM Email to a Friend Printer Friendly Version

By Jerry Burke

A young Menasha man is still missing in Japan. Andy Lathrop, 20, vanished a week ago while he was presumably hiking in a national park near Hakedote. He was in Japan to teach English for the past year, as part of his college education.

Lathrop's family is trying to remain optimistic he'll be found alive. His parents and two brothers arrived in Japan over the weekend to help with the search. One of his brothers called and told the rest of the family what's going on.

"He said they were just really pooped out and stressed, and just had been searching and searching, and their other son was going to go down a steep mountain with some of the Japanese there to do some searching down a mountain," Brenda Freimuth, Andy's aunt, relayed.

A number of fund-raising efforts are going on to help the Lathrop family during their search.

Fazoli's restaurant in Appleton, where Andy used to work, is donating 15 percent of its receptions every day until Andy is found. It's also collecting donations.

The Lathrops' church in Appleton, Valley Lutheran Church, is also raising money.

The family established a website, FindAndy.org.

The family acknowledges that it's a week to a day since Andy disappeared is severely testing their optimism that he'll be found alive.

"I'm still optimistic that I think he went for a hike and possibly could be hurt and still laying somewhere. It's happened before to other people that they've been missing for several days and are still alive," Andy's uncle, Dave Lathrop, said.

"You keep thinking all these things through your mind, some of the bad things, you picture bad things happening, but you hope you get a phone call saying we found him and he's okay," his aunt said.

The family says despite some reports, police told them where Andy disappeared has a very low crime rate. They're praying that bodes well for Andy, a U.W.-Madison student who wants to someday teach in the country he's grown to love.






Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Aug 25 2005, 08:37 AM Post #5


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Funds bolster search for man

Posted Aug. 23, 2005


How to help

Donations to offset the Lathrop family’s expenses in searching for their son can be done in the following ways:

• Go on-line to www.findandy.org.

• Stop by U.S. Bank branch and donate to the Andy Lathrop account.

• Send a check made out to the Andy Lathrop Fund to Zion Lutheran Church, 912 N. Oneida St., Appleton, 54911.

• Eat at the Fazoli’s Restaurant, 1550 Appleton Road, Menasha, and ask for a coupon to help Find Andy. After six weeks, the restaurant will donate 15 percent of those orders to the Lathrop family fund.


By Michael King
Post-Crescent staff writer

MENASHA — Eduardo Sanchez recalls working alongside a polite and hardworking young man at the Fazoli’s Restaurant at 1550 Appleton Road for two years.

When Andy Lathrop quit to go to college, he remembered thinking how it would be tough to replace such “a great worker, excellent person and a great team player.”

Last week, when Sanchez and another manager learned Lathrop, who had worked at the restaurant for three years, was missing in Japan, they wondered how they might be able to help.

On Monday, Fazoli’s started raising funds through its “Good Food, Good Cause” coupon campaign to help the Lathrop family defray personal expenses involved in flying to Japan and searching for Lathrop, 20, who was last seen a week ago.

The Fazoli’s campaign, which will go for six weeks, is one of several efforts in the Fox Valley area in response to the family’s plight. Lathrop remained missing Monday.

Lathrop, who spent the last year in Japan under an exchange program internship where he helped teach English to Japanese youth, went missing on Aug. 15, five days before he was scheduled to return home. His parents, Steven and Lesley, and siblings, Scott and Jessica, flew to Hakodate, a city in northern Japan Friday and began searching for him over the weekend where he had been last seen.

Andy’s grandmother, Audrey Lathrop of Appleton, said she talked to her son, Steven, on Sunday “and there was no sign of anything.”

Donations are also being accepted at any U.S. Bank branch or online at the Web site www.find andy.org. Checks may also be sent to the Andy Lathrop Fund in care of Zion Lutheran Church, 912 N. Oneida St., Appleton, WI 54911.

“We have several thousand (dollars) in already,” mostly from the Web site and Fox Valley area churches, said Andy’s uncle, Martin Eiden of Germantown.

Sanchez said Fazoli’s is glad to help by offering 15 percent of receipts from coupon holders or anyone indicating they want to participate.

“We had about seven people come (for lunch Monday) and they spent about $50,” he said. “We’re going to try to be aggressive and raise as much as we can.”





Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Aug 25 2005, 08:38 AM Post #6


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Search for missing Menasha man comes up empty

Posted Aug. 25, 2005

On the Net
findandy.org

By Michael King
Gannett Wisconsin Newspapers

APPLETON — After an emotionally draining five days of searching, the family of a Menasha man missing since Aug. 15 is heading home from Japan.

Extensive search efforts have yielded few clues regarding what happened to Andy Lathrop, 20, who had been in Japan since last August.

“They’re spent,” Martin Eiden of Germantown said Wednesday night of his sister, Lesley Lathrop, her husband, Steven, and their children, Scott and Jessica, who arrived Sunday in Hakodate, Japan. “They’ve been over there getting no sleep and participating in 12- to 14-hour daily searches. It’s taken its toll.”

Andy Lathrop had finished his internship with Labo International Exchange Foundation, primarily teaching English to Japanese youth planning exchange visits to the United States. He decided to do some traveling less than a week before he was to return home.

A “full blown search” involving a helicopter, coast guard ship, four scuba divers and many volunteers on Tuesday of the beach area where Lathrop had last been seen came up empty, Eiden said. The next day, a Japanese salvage operator volunteered to take them out again at Hakodate, a northern Japan seaport of about 200,000 people.

“When they went out, they were met by a fleet of seven boats (so) they had eight boats with seasoned fishermen, making a further investigation and (covering a) greater area than the initial coast guard investigation,” Eiden said.

“They are overwhelmed by the outpouring of sympathy and help that the local residents are giving them.”

Searchers had found some of Andy’s clothes in a locker by the beach but no sign of “any of his electronics, his iPod, camera, cell phone and credit card,” Eiden said.

They also located “a family on the beach he was conversing with.” The family thought he was Japanese because he spoke the language fluently.

“He said he was going to swim out to the island,” across a small channel only about 20 feet wide. According to family members, Andy is a good swimmer and not likely to be a risk taker.

Police reportedly have a videotape someone had taken of the island showing Lathrop on the shore but no solid information about why he subsequently disappeared.

Asked if they or police suspect foul play, Eiden said, “I don’t know. Everything is still open.

“They’re still treating it as a missing person, I guess,” he said. “The whole thing is so bizarre.”

Eiden said family members are glad they went to Japan but now are resigned to the fact there is not much more they can do.

Going to Japan gave them the “personal satisfaction that everything that could possibly be done has been done.” Eiden said. “Just their presence over there opened up a lot more avenues. And, the outpouring of kindness by the Japanese people; they’re overwhelmed by it.”

— Michael King writes for The Post-Crescent of Appleton.






Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Aug 25 2005, 08:40 AM Post #7


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Family of missing Menasha man returning from Japan

(Published Thursday, August 25, 2005 08:51:05 AM CDT)

Associated Press

MENASHA, Wis. - The family of a Menasha man missing since Aug. 15 in Japan is heading home after five days of searching there, a relative says.

"They're spent," Martin Eiden of Germantown said Wednesday night of his sister, Lesley Lathrop; her husband, Steven; and their other children, Scott and Jessica. "They've been over there getting no sleep and participating in 12- to 14-hour daily searches. It's taken its toll."

They had gone to the northern port city of Hakodate to look for Andy Lathrop, 20, who had moved to Japan a year ago and had been teaching English through the Labo International Exchange Foundation.

A "full-blown search" involving a helicopter, coast guard ship, scuba divers and volunteers came up empty Tuesday in the beach area where Lathrop had last been seen, Eiden said.

He said a salvage operator volunteered to take them out again the next day.

"When they went out, they were met by a fleet of seven boats ... and (covered a) greater area than the initial coast guard investigation," Eiden said.

"They are overwhelmed by the outpouring of sympathy and help that the local residents are giving them."

Searchers have found some of Andy Lathrops clothes in a locker at the beach but no sign of "any of his electronics, his iPod, camera, cell phone and credit card," Eiden said.

They also located a family who talked with him, Eiden said.

"He said he was going to swim out to the island," across a small channel only about 20 feet wide, Eiden said.

Eiden said the family members were glad they had gone to Japan but were now resigned to the fact there was not much more they could do.





Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Aug 29 2005, 08:51 AM Post #8


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Family hopeful missing student is still alive

Posted Aug. 29, 2005

Lathrops return to Menasha after exhausting Japan hunt

By J.E. Espino
Post-Crescent staff writer

MENASHA — The Menasha couple who traveled last week to Japan in search of their missing son returned Saturday, satisfied with authorities’ investigation into his disappearance, but frustrated he hasn’t been found.

“It gives you peace of mind that they really looked,” Lesley Lathrop said Sunday of the extensive search Japanese police and rescue units promptly mounted when her 20-year-old son Andy was reported missing Aug. 15, five days before he was to return home.

Lesley and Steven Lathrop, who went to Japan with their children Scott, 28, and Jessica, 19, fear that Andy may have been abducted or is dead, but are hopeful he is only lost.

“It’s a sad mystery,” said Lesley. “I really don’t know what happened. “We may never know.”

A credit card, cell phone and iPod Andy was carrying with him while touring Hakodate, a seaport city in northern Japan, have not been used or turned up.

The fact that a body has not been found, plus the absence of birds of prey in the search area, lead them to believe he may not have drowned.

“I’m giving it to God; he’s lost,” Lesley said.

The Lathrops said they want to continue encouraging the Japanese government to look for their son, and after witnessing firsthand the diligence of law enforcement, they are confident it will.

“There were magnificent searches” that she didn’t think would’ve taken place here, Lesley said.

For Steven, there was a sense of powerlessness, noting he sometimes “felt kind of useless” because he could not participate in more active searching. But there was no question about the value of the trip.

“We had to go,” he said.

Back home, it is a matter of regrouping. Missing posters, in Japanese and in English, with Andy’s picture have been posted. As a next step, they want to explore the possibility of contacting ports and Interpol, the international criminal police organization.

Andy had postponed his sophomore year at University of Wisconsin-Madison to complete a one-year internship with the Labo International Exchange Foundation.

He decided to do some traveling in Hakodate before coming home. He was to have met that traveling companion at the Hakodate Station the day he disappeared but never showed up.

Steven Lathrop dismissed any suggestions his son may have run away, pointing out that his passport and other documents were still at his host family’s home. His bags had been packed.

Going to Japan and meeting the people helped Lesley understand Andy’s fascination and passion for the country and its culture. She remembered her son saying he would want to return there for graduate school.

“Now I know why he loves Japan,” she said.

To people she met, his disappearance had come as a shock. “They’ve never seen anything like it.

“I still have hope,” she said, largely because Andy is such “a smart kid.”



J.E. Espino can be reached at 920-993-1000, ext. 426, or by e-mail at jespino@postcrescent.com Post-Crescent staff writer Michael King contributed to this report.




Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Aug 31 2005, 09:24 AM Post #9


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



No traces found of missing UW sophomore in Japan

By Sarah Martinson/The Daily Cardinal
Published: Wednesday, August 31, 2005

Two weeks ago, Andy Lathrop, a UW-Madison sophomore from Menasha, Wis., went missing in Hakodate, Japan. Lathrop was last heard from Aug. 15 before he failed to meet his friend, Ariel Smoke, at the train station where the two were to catch a train to Tokyo so they could fly home to the states.

Lathrop went to Japan last September as an intern for Labo, an international exchange program designed to teach Japanese children to read and write English.

For his last weekend in Japan, he and Smoke decided to take a trip together to Hakodate. On the day of his disappearance they made plans to split up so he could hike in a national park an hour's train ride away.

But Lathrop discovered a beach and communicated to Smoke through text message that he would stay there instead. This message was the last Smoke received from him.

Lathrop then went to a rocky shore where a bridge was once connected to a small island. A few people there spoke to him and helped him put his electronics in a plastic bag before he waded across the water to the island.

Witnesses say they last saw him waving from the island.

After he had not returned to meet Smoke that afternoon at the train station, she contacted the Labo and the local police who searched the area.

Days passed with no evidence of Lathrop. His family flew to Japan last Saturday and searched for almost a week to no avail.

"On the outside I'm holding up really good, but on the inside I'm really mushy," said Lathrop's mother Lesley.

According to Maki Shimotani, Lathrop's Japanese teacher, he was a good student, enthusiastic and very respectful.

Lathrop said he was originally going to major in international business but recently switched to architecture.

He was fluent in Japanese and also spoke Spanish, French and a little German.

"People thought he was from Japan he spoke so well," said Kirsten Krudwig, UW-Madison junior and close friend of Andy.

The family set up a website, www.findandy.org, which accepts donations to help locate their son.

"It's pretty hard, you always think it's someone else's kid it's going to happen to and when it hits home, it's very hard," Lathrop said.




Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Aug 31 2005, 09:26 AM Post #10


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Abduction scenario explored

Posted Aug. 30, 2005

Last we knew: Andy Lathrop’s family returned from a week in Japan, where they searched in vain for the missing Menasha intern.

The latest: Searches continue in Japan, including the assignment of two special police detectives.

What it means: Since searches failed to turn up a body from a drowning, authorities may be looking at a possible abduction.

On the Web

www.findandy.org



Family: Search for local student gets extra effort by Japan police

By Michael King
Post-Crescent staff writer

MENASHA — Two special police detectives have been assigned to the search in Hakodate, Japan, for Andy Lathrop, the missing Menasha intern who vanished two weeks ago.

For family members who returned home Sunday after a week of searching for the 20-year-old Menasha man, news of the extra manpower was encouraging.

“It’s good to hear the news this morning that they’re not giving up,” said Andy’s father, Steven Lathrop, an electrician at a Menasha paper mill.

Thoughts that Andy fell victim to a climbing accident or possibly drowned have been lessened by the fact that his body has not washed ashore or been found in any of the extensive searches of the water and rocky beach area where he was last seen and the adjacent mountainous area.

Now, authorities may be exploring other options, including possible abduction.

“I think they’re looking now at a different area, that maybe he was taken,” said his mother Lesley Lathrop, an intensive care nurse in Appleton. “I just don’t feel that he’s still on that island; otherwise he’d be seen.”

Lathrop, who was supposed to return to the U.S. five days after he went missing Aug. 15, had finished his work as an intern with Labo International Exchange Foundation when he disappeared while traveling.

“He had swim trunks and sandals on so he wasn’t going to climb a mountain, we don’t think,” said Steve Lathrop.

The Menasha couple and their other two children spent more than $8,000 last week, mostly to fly to and from Japan in a search for clues as to how Andy disappeared. He was last seen in the background of a videotape taken by a family from a sailboat. He was sitting on stone steps, the last remnants of a bridge.

A Japanese couple told police they had talked to Andy by the steps and watched as he swam across a channel 20 to 30 feet across while holding a plastic bag overhead containing his electronic items. He made it safely to the other side but he has not been seen since.

Andy’s sister, Jessica Lathrop, 19, agrees that an abduction is a possible scenario, though there is no evidence of it. She guessed that if a boat had approached her brother after he swam across the channel in front of a cave leading into the mountains, he might have accepted a ride.

“I think he would have been trusting enough to say, ‘Well, I need to be back at this time, is that all right?’ And they would have said yes and maybe not taken him back. That is a possibility.”

“I was actually thankful they didn’t find a body,” Steven said. “I think he’s still alive. We’ve got to find him somewhere.”

By going to Japan, the family realized how extensive the searching was and also saw firsthand how much others “love that kid,” Steven said.

An official from the Labo foundation, who has helped spearhead search efforts, told the family police consider it “really odd” that they have not yet found any of Andy’s electronic equipment, a red vodaphone, iPod, camera and wallet.

Family members said Andy would never stay away from them willingly. “He wouldn’t cause pain like this to anybody,” Jessica said.

“I have a feeling he’ll come home anywhere from a couple months to five years and be like, ‘Do I have a story for you,’” said Jessica, who is heading back to college this week. “I just feel that’s something that could happen.”

Fund-raiser set

What: Fund-raiser for the family of Andy Lathrop.

When: Noon to 7 p.m., Sept. 11.

Where: Prime Quarter Steakhouse, 500 N. Westhill Blvd., Grand Chute.

Why: To offset expenses incurred on the family’s trip to Japan last week.

Details: The restaurant is donating its staff and building for the event plus proceeds after costs of food and beverage sales. A silent auction will be held from noon to 3 p.m. There will be live music and the Green Bay Packers game will be broadcast on the big screen television.




Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Aug 31 2005, 09:29 AM Post #11


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Lathrops Gather with Family and Friends

Aug 31, 2005, 07:29 AM

By Jason Allen

The Lathrops caught up with some of their closest friends and supporters since their son Andy vanished in Japan (see related story ). It hasn't just been a few family members involved in this search; it's extended to friends, neighbors, a community all doing whatever they can to aid in the search for someone they miss.

Monday night was a night for sharing hugs and sharing stories with everyone who's been affected by Andy Lathrop's disappearance.

Friends and family looked at pictures of the Japanese coastline where he was last seen. They scoured maps to get an idea of the landscape he disappeared from, and where the Lathrop family spent hours every day last week searching for clues.

"It's a parent's worst nightmare. It's got to be a parent's worst nightmare," family friend Cindy Sindahl said.

Sindahl and Nancy Elbe are just a couple of the many friends who are helping the family out. Any is the same age as their sons.

"As a friend," Nancy Elbe said, "you just cannot even imagine what they're going through, as hard as you try, no matter how close you are."

While the immediate search is something the family is taking care of, the greater impact of the situation extends out to everyone who knows Andy, friends say, and they're not giving up hope of finding him.

"As long as they continue to be positive, I wouldn't be a very good friend if I didn't support and share that same emotion with them," Elbe said.

"When you have one parent that gets hurt, then we all go running. He was part of a big group of people," said Sindahl.




Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Aug 31 2005, 09:32 AM Post #12


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Lathrops cling to hope about fate of missing son

Posted Aug. 31, 2005

MENASHA — The family of Andy Lathrop hasn’t given up hope.

On Saturday, Lesley and Steve Lathrop returned to their Menasha home after searching in Japan for their missing son.

While the Lathrops are satisfied with authorities’ investigation into Andy’s disappearance, they are frustrated that he hasn’t been found.

“It gives you peace of mind that they really looked,” Lesley Lathrop said Sunday of the extensive search Japanese police and rescue units promptly mounted when her 20-year-old son Andy was reported missing Aug. 15, five days before he was to return home.

Lesley and Steven Lathrop, who went to Japan with their children Scott, 28, and Jessica, 19, fear that Andy may have been abducted or is dead, but are hopeful he is only lost.

“It’s a sad mystery,” said Lesley. “I really don’t know what happened. “We may never know.”

A credit card, cell phone and iPod Andy was carrying with him while touring Hakodate, a seaport city in northern Japan, have not been used or turned up.

The fact that a body has not been found, plus the absence of birds of prey in the search area, lead them to believe he may not have drowned.

“I’m giving it to God; he’s lost,” Lesley said.

The Lathrops said they want to continue encouraging the Japanese government to look for their son, and after witnessing firsthand the diligence of law enforcement, they are confident it will.

“There were magnificent searches” that she didn’t think would’ve taken place here, Lesley said.

For Steven, there was a sense of powerlessness, noting he sometimes “felt kind of useless” because he could not participate in more active searching. But there was no question about the value of the trip.

“We had to go,” he said.

Back home, it is a matter of regrouping. Missing posters, in Japanese and in English, with Andy’s picture have been posted. As a next step, they want to explore the possibility of contacting ports and Interpol, the international criminal police organization.

Andy had postponed his sophomore year at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to complete a one-year internship with the Labo International Exchange Foundation.

He decided to do some traveling in Hakodate before coming home. He was to have met a traveling companion at the Hakodate Station the day he disappeared but never showed up.

Steven Lathrop dismissed any suggestions his son may have run away, pointing out that his passport and other documents were still at his host family’s home. His bags had been packed.

Going to Japan and meeting the people helped Lesley understand Andy’s fascination and passion for the country and its culture. She remembered her son saying he would want to return there for graduate school.

“Now I know why he loves Japan,” she said.

To people she met, his disappearance had come as a shock.

“I still have hope,” she said, largely because Andy is such “a smart kid.”





Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Sep 10 2005, 09:15 AM Post #13


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Support steadfast for family of missing man

Posted Sept. 10, 2005

By Michael King
Post-Crescent staff writer

TOWN OF MEN-ASHA — Her husband and oldest son have returned to work and her daughter went away to college, but Lesley Lathrop remains a mother on a mission.

Since her youngest son, Andy, mysteriously disappeared Aug. 15 while traveling in Japan, Lathrop has taken extended vacation and put her career as an intensive care nurse at Appleton Medical Center on hold.

While there are still no clues as to why her 20-year-old son went missing in Hakodate, Japan, she remains hopeful for his safe return and does what she can to keep his case alive.

“It’s frustrating (not knowing what happened) but I have such nice support,” Lathrop said late this week. “I’m not doing it alone.”

The long-distance divide makes searching difficult, but Lathrop also finds comfort in friends and an outpouring of public support and love. “We live in a great community; people really care,” she said.

On Sunday, the public will have another chance to help the Lathrop family defray its extensive travel and search expenses in a fund-raiser at The Prime Quarter Steakhouse, 500 N. Westhill Blvd., Grand Chute.

Lathrop doesn’t know how or why her son disappeared but believes an abduction theory is as plausible as any.

“He could have (got on a boat), I don’t know,” she said. “His body didn’t come up and the fishermen said if he would have drowned it would have come up. It makes sense that he could have got on a boat with someone.”

Andy’s cell phone, iPod, camera and wallet remain missing. Last weekend, a 20-minute show on his disappearance broadcast on Japan national television yielded no viewers who recognized him, she said.

Since Andy, who disappeared five days before he was to return to the United States after a year-long internship, is under 21, Town of Menasha police this week took an initial missing persons report to get him registered on the National Crime Information Center system. Lesley Lathrop continues to pursue leads, contacting the IRS to make sure his social security number is not used and exploring how to get the word out internationally through posters given to Interpol and other agencies.

A week ago, the family had the difficult job of opening boxes of clothing and books Andy had sent back from Japan. They’re still waiting to get a suitcase and computer that might be examined for any clues.

On Wednesday, AMC and Theda Clark Medical Center, where Lesley previously worked, held a bake sale to raise money to aid the family.

“People were just extremely generous,” said Dottie Kraus of Appleton, a friend and former co-worker. She said the bake sale raised around $2,000 at Theda Clark.“(Lesley Lathrop) has a very strong faith,.” Kraus said. “I think that along with the support of family and friends and the whole community, that’s getting them through this.”


Quick read
Last we knew: Searches are ongoing in Japan for Andy Lathrop, including police detectives exploring a possible abduction angle.

The latest: Friends and relatives are holding a fund raiser Sunday.

What it means: Having spent more than $8,000 for airfare alone, fund-raising efforts are helping the family offset travel and search expenses.

If you go

WHAT: Fund-raiser for the Andy Lathrop family

WHEN: Noon to 7 p.m. Sunday

WHY: To offset expenses incurred on a trip to Japan last month to search for their missing 20-year-old son and brother.

WHERE: The Prime Quarter Steakhouse, 500 N. Westhill Blvd., Grand Chute.

DETAILS: Restaurant is donating staff and building plus proceeds after costs of food and beverage sales. Silent auction of donated items from noon to 3 p.m. Live music along with the Packers game on a big-screen television starting at 3:15 p.m. Thrivent Financial for Lutherans offering supplemental funding to any money raised.

On the Web
www.findandy.org
Michael King can be reached at 920-729-6622, ext. 33, or by e-mail at mking@ postcrescent.com




Full Edit
Quick Edit
Sisu Sep 25 2005, 06:46 AM Post #14


Administrator - Owner


Group: Admin
Posts: 8,659
Joined: 8-August 05
Member No.: 1



http://www.wbay.com/Global/story.asp?S=3887240&nav=51s7

Town of Menasha
New Approach in Search for Missing Menasha Man
Sep 22, 2005, 07:35 PM CDT


There's a different approach in the search for a Menasha college student who vanished five weeks ago today in Japan.

Despite the distance involved, Andy Lathrop's parents are hoping their local police department can help.

A computer message, sent by the Town of Menasha Police Department about Andy Lathrop's disappearance, is now in the hands of police departments worldwide.

It was sent after Andy's parents asked local police to help find their son, even though he vanished thousands of miles away in Japan.

Andy's parents made the move for two reasons. One, they fear something may have been lost in translation and two, it's time for some new eyes to look at the case.

"As a mother, I think I need to have someone at this end review the paperwork and say okay this was done, this can be done next," said Andy's mom, Lesley Lathrop.

The lathrop's are hoping having the Town of Menasha police send out a report to police agencies around the world will at least turn up one clue about what happened to their son.

Local detectives say they already see something disconcerning about people who were with Andy.

"We have information some of the persons who've returned to the United States haven't been spoken to, that's what we'll be attempting to do," said Lt. Doug Jahsman of the Town of Menasha Police.

Andy's mom says she's trying to remain optimistic that her son is alive. But that with each passing day that's getting more difficult.

"What's being tested is my strength,...you know,...it's hard."

The Lathrop's pray they'll know something soon.




Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Oct 18 2005, 08:54 AM Post #15


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Missing UW student a mystery

By Doug Moe
October 18, 2005

ANDY LATHROP was supposed to be back in Wisconsin by now. That was the plan. Maybe he'd have been with his parents in Menasha, or perhaps he would already have come back to Madison, to prepare for the spring semester at UW.

The glorious year he'd spent in Japan teaching English to Japanese children had gone too quickly. He went into private homes and helped the kids put on plays and sing songs and he loved it, his mom, Lesley Lathrop, was saying Monday.

The year was short but now for the Lathrop family the days are long, because of what happened one August day in Hakodate, a port city on the island of Hokkaido in northern Japan.

Andy, 20, had gone to Hakodate with an American friend and fellow teacher, Ariel Smoke. They took the train from Tokyo, where they were based, on Aug. 13 - a ride of more than 20 hours - and then a ferry took them across to Hakodate.

Before leaving Tokyo, Andy had packed to return to Wisconsin, but it was certain he would also one day be going back to Japan. Although he planned to enroll again at UW-Madison - where he'd spent his freshman year in 2003-2004 - Lathrop had already made inquiries about graduate schools in Japan. He loved the language and anticipated a career in international business or perhaps architecture. He revered Frank Lloyd Wright.

Andy and Ariel arrived in Hakodate shortly after midnight on Aug. 14. They taxied to the Hakodate Kenkou Center. After a few hours sleep, they spent most of the day touring Hakodate, a city of some 300,000.

That evening they decided to split up the next day, because Andy wanted to hike in a national park that was an hour away by train. They'd meet later that afternoon to catch the ferry to the mainland and then the train back to Tokyo.

The next day, Aug. 15, began according to plan. About 7 a.m. Ariel spotted Andy going to the showers at the Hakodate Kenkou Center.

At 7:24, Ariel received a text message from Andy: "I'm leaving."

About an hour and a half later, at 9 a.m., Ariel got another text message: "Ferry at 5:30 p.m. from Hakodate to mainland." Ten minutes later, another: "Let's meet at the station at 4:30 p.m."

A little before 10 a.m., Lathrop wrote again, signaling a change in his plans. "I decided to stay in Hakodate. I walked to the swimming area and a ways and the sea is beautiful."

Ariel Smoke spent the rest of the day exploring more of Hakodate, and then got to the ferry a little after 4 p.m. At 4:09 she sent Andy a text message: "I'm at the station."

Lathrop did not respond, nor did he appear at 4:30, the time he had suggested to meet. Hours passed. Finally, at 10 p.m., Smoke phoned Shanti Laird in Tokyo. Laird is a coordinator with the Labo International Exchange Foundation, which had arranged Lathrop's teaching position in Japan.

"Call the police," Laird said.

The authorities give a missing person 48 hours to show up; in the meantime, Laird flew to Hakodate.

She and Smoke searched and found nothing, nor did the police once they became involved.

Lesley Lathrop and her husband, Steve Lathrop, flew to Tokyo, arriving Aug. 20. The next day, with the Labo staff, Andy's parents gave a press conference in Hakodate. The media were eager for the story - five newspapers and four TV stations covered it. The publicity brought forward two individuals who had seen Andy the morning of Aug. 15.

One remembered him sitting near the water on a rocky shoreline not far from the ferry landing. It was a little before 10 a.m. and Andy had been eating some bread and text messaging. Another couple recalled Andy in the same general area, climbing out of the water after swimming. That was about 10:30.

Andy's clothes were found in a swim locker. His return ticket on the ferry was never used.

Divers searched the bay and found nothing. Search dogs came up empty. More than 1,100 "Find Andy" posters were distributed. Nothing.

The Lathrops flew home Aug. 27.

Friday night, Lesley Lathrop went on Greta Van Susteren's Fox News show to talk about her son.

Van Susteren asked: "Is it your thought that something, that there's been foul play, that there's been an accident or is he the type of young man that would simply take, you know, take a private trip for lack of a better way to describe it?"

Lesley Lathrop replied: "We don't think he took a private trip. He was there with a good friend and she was waiting for him at the ferry to return back to the mainland. We have no proof of foul play but we have no proof of drowning. All we know right now is that he's actually missing."

I reached Lesley Lathrop Monday at the family home in Menasha.

"We just don't know what happened," she said.

Heard something Moe should know? Call 252-6446, write PO Box 8060, Madison, WI 53708, or e-mail dmoe@madison.com.





Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Jan 22 2006, 11:13 AM Post #16


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



source

Jan 22, 2006 10:06 am US/Central

Mother Of Missing Menasha Man Lends Support

(AP) MENASHA The mother of a Menasha man who was last seen in Japan five months ago is trying to help others involved in missing persons cases.

Lesley Lathrop's 20-year-old son, Andy, disappeared in August while traveling in northern Japan, and numerous searches for him proved futile.

Last week, Lesley Lathrop attended a court hearing in Winnebago County to provide moral support to the family of a Menasha murder victim, who was missing for two days before her body was found in November 2004.

The Lathrop family also has used money donated to their search effort to pay for a Town of Menasha police detective to attend training sponsored in part by the National Center for Missing Adults.

The family is also helping other law enforcement officers attend similar training next month.





Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Jan 22 2006, 11:15 AM Post #17


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



Source

Posted January 22, 2006

Mother offers others support

Town of Menasha man, 21, remains missing in Japan

By Michael King
Post-Crescent staff writer

TOWN OF MENA-SHA — Lesley Lathrop has her own way of dealing with the heartache of a missing son who disappeared five months ago in Japan.

Asked if there was anything new to report on her now 21-year-old son, Andy, Lathrop said, "He still forgot to come home."

In the months since her son disappeared while traveling in northern Japan, Lathrop said she continues to work with law enforcement on missing persons issues whenever possible.

On Thursday, Lathrop attended a court hearing in Winnebago County to provide moral support to the family of homicide victim Christina Ross of Menasha.

"I didn't know (Christina's parents, Bob and Cindy Ross of Menasha) previous to Andrew going missing," she said.

But, she has since "had some small contacts with them" as Christina Ross also was missing for two days in November 2004 before her body was found.

Andy Lathrop had finished a yearlong internship in Japan in August when he and another intern traveled to northern Japan a few days before flying back to the United States. They went their separate ways for a few hours on Aug. 16 expecting to reunite later that day at the train station.

Lathrop, who was 20 at the time, has not been seen since. Numerous searches have proved futile.

In October, the Lathrop family used funds donated to the search effort to pay for a Town of Menasha police detective to attend training sponsored by Fox Valley Technical College's Criminal Justice Center for Innovation and the National Center for Missing Adults.

They also are helping other local law enforcement attend a similar police training conference Feb. 8-10 entitled, "Uniting in the Search for Missing Children and Adults: Providing a Voice for Those who have Vanished."

Cindy Ross, who has become a victim's advocate for missing persons, will be one of the presenters at the conference.

Lesley Lathrop also will be involved in a Feb. 11 Bringing Safety Home family conference sponsored by Youth Educated in Safety, an Appleton-based nonprofit organization.

Andy Lathrop, who spoke fluent Japanese, chose to forego his sophomore year at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to work as an intern with Labo International Exchange Foundation in Japan. He was last seen on a rocky beach area in Hakodate, a northern Japan seaport city.




Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Mar 13 2006, 07:01 PM Post #18


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



http://www.madison.com/tct/news/index.php?ntid=76103&ntpid=0

Moms with little in common share sorrow of missing sons

By Samara Kalk Derby

Lesley Lathrop can relate intimately with Hiromi Ohmi, the mother of a Japanese student studying in Madison who disappeared more than a month ago.

The women, from two different worlds, have a bond few could ever know or want to know. It is a connection that transcends language, culture and distance.

The two women are living eerily parallel lives.

Ohmi's 20-year-old son, Kenji, was last seen on a surveillance video at 6:30 a.m. Jan. 28 leaving the downtown apartment he shared with two international students. Kenji had been studying at the Wisconsin English as a Second Language Institute, 19 N. Pinckney St., for just a month.

Meanwhile, Lathrop's son, Andrew, a UW-Madison student, vanished last summer in Japan. He was also 20 at the time. After a yearlong internship teaching English, Andrew was last seen on a rocky beach area in the northern seaport city of Hakodate. Searchers, including divers, have come up empty-handed.

Lathrop traveled to Madison from her Menasha home, about two hours northeast of Madison, late last month to meet with Kenji's mother.

The hardest thing about having a loved one go missing in a foreign culture is not knowing whom to contact, Lathrop said.

"At least in Menasha I know whom to call and whom to contact - from senators, congressmen and police officers to neighbors and church members," she said.

Two detectives have been assigned to Kenji's case, and there have been no new developments, said police spokesman Michael Hanson.

"We still don't think there is foul play or anything suspicious," he said. "We do have our theories based on information we've obtained. It's a missing persons case. We aren't ruling out any possibilities."

Hanson said the department gets missing adult cases on a weekly basis and can get missing teen cases daily. Some days, as many as four teenagers may not return home from school, but they usually turn up within a day or two, one week at the most, he said.

"The circumstances with this one are a little bit different," he said, but did not elaborate.

Cindy Buechner, law enforcement coordinator for Madison Area Crime Stoppers, said she has received 12 to 15 tips on Kenji's disappearance, which is a lot for one case. Tips are still coming in, but not as quickly, she said.

Lathrop, meanwhile, knows the anguish of tips that don't pan out and wanted Ohmi to feel secure that the police and others in Madison were working hard to find her son. She also wanted Ohmi to feel less alone in a strange place going through a mother's worst nightmare.

Part of her motivation may have also been selfish, Lathrop admits, adding that she hoped their conversations would help her healing.

Lathrop said she had no interest in traveling to Japan when she went there for a week last August in search of her son.

"I felt like a true alien. I didn't speak or understand any Japanese," she said. Changing money, which foreign travelers do routinely, was an unpleasant experience for her.

"We went from our USA culture with direct eye contact and direct questions to a Japanese culture that is so polite they don't make eye contact," she said.

The entire time she was in Japan she felt like she was inconveniencing people by asking them to look for her son, taking them away from their own families, she said.

Similarly, Hiromi Ohmi never expected to come to America. "She was more of a homebody," Lathrop said.

Ohmi and her husband, Seitoku, turned down all interview requests but before returning to Kyoto last week, they wrote a note thanking everyone who helped in the search.

"We have received so much support in response to Kenji's disappearance and are deeply thankful for the help provided by the Madison community and people throughout the country," the Ohmis wrote.

"There are no words to express our gratitude for your kindness, words of encouragement, and tireless effort to find Kenji," the note continued. "Your support has given us hope that Kenji will come home someday. We thank you from the bottom of our hearts."

After his disappearance, students at WESLI as well as members of the Madison Japan Association blanketed downtown Madison with photos of Kenji.

Amy Osorio, co-director at WESLI, said the school must have copied at least 1,000 fliers.

Similarly, there were posters of Andrew all over Hakodate after his disappearance. But despite the efforts to find her son and the media attention, Lathrop said she always questioned whether people were really looking and if messages were getting lost in translation.

"We had the same mom issues. You can't eat, you can't drink - even though you know you should be drinking water to hydrate yourself. You can't sleep at all. You want to walk around almost aimlessly," Lathrop said.

Last summer she walked around Hakodate continuously in the hopes she would see Andrew, the same way she said Ohmi walked State Street each day.

Before her meeting with Ohmi, Lathrop said she always told herself that her son just "forgot to come home."

But after befriending her Japanese counterpart she said she was able to confront facts.

"I had to realize that Andy didn't forget to come home. That he didn't come home, and that he really was missing."




Full Edit
Quick Edit
Posting Goddess Aug 14 2006, 10:45 PM Post #19


Senior Administrator


Group: Admins
Posts: 15,847
Joined: 9-August 05
From: St. Louis Metro Area
Member No.: 6



http://www.postcrescent.com/apps/pbcs.dll/...1/60814066/1979

LATHROP DISAPPEARANCE

Aug. 13, 2005: Andy Lathrop and another American intern, travel by train from Tokyo to seaport city of Hakodate in northern Japan less than a week before they fly back to the U.S.
Aug. 14: Andy and fellow intern tour the island and go to a small beach.
Aug. 15: Andy and intern split up because Andy wanted to hike in a national park an hour away.
Aug. 15: They exchange text messages about 9 a.m., agreeing to meet at the station at 4:30 p.m. to take the ferry from Hakodate to mainland Japan.
Aug. 15: At 9:53 a.m., Andy’s final text message: “I decided to stay in Hakodate, I walked to swimming area and a ways and the sea is beautiful.”
Aug. 15: At 9:56 a.m., a videotape taken by a man and his family from a sailboat shows Andy sitting on stairs near a cave on the rocky shore, not far from a coffee shop. An hour later, when the sailboat returned, Andy was not seen.
Aug. 15: At 10:30 a.m., a Japanese couple talk to Andy at the stairs before he swims across the channel to the other side of the cave. Andy had his red cell phone, iPod and camera in a plastic bag, none of which have ever been found.
Aug. 15: At noon, when the Japanese couple left the coffee shop, they did not see Andy.
Aug. 15: At 4:09 p.m., the fellow intern text messages Andy that “I’m at the station” but gets no reply.
Aug. 16: Early morning phone call notifies Steve and Lesley Lathrop that Andy is missing.
Aug. 20: Lathrop family arrives in Tokyo. They fly to Hakodate the next day and have a give press conference. They oversee the ongoing search efforts before returning a week later.

ON THE WEB
www.findandy.org

HOW TO HELP

A Tribute to Andy Lathrop Scholarship has been started at Fox Valley Technical College through a $5,000 donation from the Lathrop family. To contribute, contact Barbara Nelson with FVTC’s Criminal Justice Center for Innovation, 920-735-4818; the FVTC Foundation office at 920-735-2478; or Lesley Lathrop.


Posted August 14, 2006

Menasha man missing for year
Family deals with fruitless search for answers

By Michael King
Post-Crescent staff writer

TOWN OF MENASHA — Andy Lathrop’s passion for Japanese and love for the Pacific island nation led him to forego his sophomore year of college and go there to teach English.

His dad, Steve Lathrop, wasn’t happy. “I just don’t like the idea of young people traveling the world,” he said. “It bothers me.”

But, knowing his son could speak Japanese fluently and had been there twice, he relented.

But on Aug. 15, 2005, a father’s concern became an ongoing heartache for Steve and Lesley Lathrop. Five days before their son was to fly home and resume classes at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, 20-year-old Andy disappeared while traveling in northern Japan.

In the year since, few clues have emerged.

“We still don’t have any answers,” said Lesley.

The initial fears were that Lathrop drowned. But searches came up empty. Abduction remains a possibility but also lacks any evidence to support that theory.

“Everybody thought that he would come ashore eventually,” Lesley said.

The passage of time has begun to erode the family’s hopes that Andy will be found alive.

“I just keep praying daily that God will let us know one way or another,” Steven Lathrop said. He sympathized with the family of Laurie Depies, a woman who disappeared from a Town of Menasha parking lot on Aug. 19, 1992.

“It’s amazing that somebody just disappeared like that,” Steven Lathrop said of Depies, who was also 20.

“I think closure is easier than not knowing,” Lesley said. “It just seems so odd. If he was alive he would, I think, be able to contact us some how.”

Since returning from their only trip to Japan in late August, Lesley has been tenacious in pursuing search efforts. “I don’t think the police are actively looking any more but the private citizens who (Andy) lived with still are searching for us.”

That includes Etsuko Ohyama, the mother of one of Andy’s host families in Japan. Two months ago, about 60 volunteers on Hakodate conducted another search “on the coast, in the mountains and also further out into the sea with some diving,” Lesley said.

Divers “tried to trace the currents” and search farther out but found nothing.

Also, officials with Labo International Exchange Foundation, the Seattle-based organization that Andy had the internship with, have “also gone back to the island a few times pursuing questions for me,” Lesley said.

“There’s still no sign of Andrew,” Lesley said. “It’s a real mystery what’s happened.”

They hope to keep the story alive by getting Andy’s case on a Japanese TV missing persons program.

The family has also sought the exhumation of a grave near where Andy disappeared but ran into cultural roadblocks.

“It’s really taboo over there to exhume a grave,” Lesley said. Search dogs had picked up Andy’s scent in a cemetery along the beach.

Support from the community raised about $20,000 used for search expenses and the family’s travel to Japan. The Lathrop family used $5,000 to start a scholarship in Andy’s name for law enforcement training related to missing persons cases.

“We want to perpetuate the education,” Lesley said. “I’m learning to help other families. It helps me (cope).”

Lesley has also donated a sample of her blood for possible DNA match, if needed.

Last September, the family arranged through contacts in New York to have a Japanese woman there go to Japan “to contact the underground bars on Hakodate” where “seedy people go” to see if anyone had heard about Andy’s case, Lesley said.

“Human trafficking, you hear about that a lot,” Steve said. But, nothing came of the effort.

“I don’t know what to do,” he said. Thankfully, Lesley “does a lot.

(Andy) could be anywhere in the world, we don’t know. North Korea? I don’t know.”

While they hope for a happy ending, their optimism has been tempered by time.

“If we do find him through this searching, do people ever really come back the same?” Lesley asked. “If you talk to people who have been sexually raped or abducted or something, do they ever come back mentally the same?”

“We’d love to have him home but you don’t know (what kind of condition),” Steven Lathrop said. “You might not even recognize his personality if he did come back. You’d just like to know, one way or another.”

Some old friends with children Andy’s age have helped the Lathrops.
“We’ve got that fellowship group on Wednesday nights that helps a lot. We cook and play games. And pray,” Lesley said, her voice cracking with emotion. “That’s been a good outlet.

“I can see how this can break up families,” Lesley said. “We struggle really hard to keep the communication lines open. We realize that we’re not angry at each other, we’re just angry at the situation.”

“We still have hope,” said Ella Eiden, Lesley’s mother and Andy’s grandmother. She said going to Japan “was his dream.”

Earlier this year, Lesley went to Madison to support the family of Japanese student Kenji Ohmi, 20, who disappeared Jan. 28.
“I got a call then when they found him in one of the lakes in Madison,” she said. “That was really hard. Now that they found him they have closure.

“That’s what I wish,” she said. “That we had some closure of (the unanswered question) ‘Where is he?’”

Michael King can be reached at 920-729-6622, ext. 33, or mking@postcrescent.com.



Begood - March 13, 2011 05:14 PM (GMT)
http://international.missingkids.com/missi...earchLang=en_X1

Missing
ANDREW LATHROP
DOB: Oct 19, 1984
Missing: Aug 15, 2005
Height: 6'0" (183 cm)
Eyes: Blue Age Now: 26
Sex: Male
Weight: 150 lbs (68 kg)
Hair: Blonde
Missing From:
HAKODATE
JAPAN
Japan
Although Andrew is originally from Menasha, Wisconsin, he was last known to be hiking in Hakodate, Japan on August 15, 2005. He has not been seen since. Andrew's nickname is Andy.

Posted and Supported by
National Center for Missing & Exploited Children - 1-800-843-5678
SPECIAL NOTE: This case was initiated pursuant to 42 U.S.C. § 5779. The individual pictured on this poster was reported missing when he or she was between the ages of 18 and 20. Law enforcement has entered this case in the FBI National Crime Information Center database and has asked NCMEC to disseminate this poster.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Town of Menasha Police Department (Wisconsin) 1-920-720-7109
note picture at site




* Hosted for free by zIFBoards